Mountain Book Programs

SpecialEvent

Come celebrate mountain literature where Michigan Ice Fest brings together writers/athletes and of course, our book loving participants!  Our programming will take place Saturday at the Michigan Ice Fest Guides  located at 112 Elm Munising. Come grab a snack and a cup of coffee and meet our featured authors!

 

 

 

 

 

 

2022 Schedule 

Saturday 4pm Michigan Ice Fest Guides 112 Elm Munising

Will Gadd

The first edition of Ice & Mixed Climbing was groundbreaking: a comprehensive instruction guide to ice and mixed climbing written by one of the sport’s premier practitioners, Will Gadd. Like its predecessor this fully revised and updated second edition features detailed instruction on technique–from the swing of the ice tool to the placement of the feet to combining actions for the greatest efficiency. New sections on climbing glacial ice and expanded discussion of dry-tool placement encourage ice and mixed climbers to get out year round, while a thoroughly revised chapter on training options help them get in top condition. Gadd has been climbing since, in his words, “dinosaurs wore crampons to Sunday school,” and in this new edition he shares what you need to know to have fun while climbing ice and mixed routes.

 

 

 

 

Kelly Cordes

Patagonia’s Cerro Torre, considered by many the most beautiful peak in the world, draws the finest and most devoted technical alpinists to its climbing challenges. But controversy has swirled around this ice-capped peak since Cesare Maestri claimed first ascent in 1959. Since then a debate has raged, with world-class climbers attempting to retrace his route but finding only contradictions. This chronicle of hubris, heroism, controversies and epic journeys offers a glimpse into the human condition, and why some pursue extreme endeavors that at face value have no worth.

 

 

 

 

 Mark Synnott

A hundred-year mystery lured veteran climber Mark Synnott into an unlikely expedition up Mount Everest during the spring 2019 season that came to be known as “the Year Everest Broke.” What he found was a gripping human story of impassioned characters from around the globe and a mountain that will consume your soul—and your life—if you let it.

The mystery? On June 8, 1924, George Mallory and Sandy Irvine set out to stand on the roof of the world, where no one had stood before. They were last seen eight hundred feet shy of Everest’s summit still “going strong” for the top. Could they have succeeded decades before Sir Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay? Irvine is believed to have carried a Kodak camera with him to record their attempt, but it, along with his body, had never been found. Did the frozen film in that camera have a photograph of Mallory and Irvine on the summit before they disappeared into the clouds, never to be seen again? Kodak says the film might still be viable. . . .

Mark Synnott made his own ascent up the infamous North Face along with his friend Renan Ozturk, a filmmaker using drones higher than any had previously flown. Readers witness first-hand how Synnott’s quest led him from oxygen-deprivation training to archives and museums in England, to Kathmandu, the Tibetan high plateau, and up the North Face into a massive storm. The infamous traffic jams of climbers at the very summit immediately resulted in tragic deaths. Sherpas revolted. Chinese officials turned on Synnott’s team. An Indian woman miraculously crawled her way to frostbitten survival. Synnott himself went off the safety rope—one slip and no one would have been able to save him—committed to solving the mystery.

Eleven climbers died on Everest that season, all of them mesmerized by an irresistible magic. The Third Pole is a rapidly accelerating ride to the limitless joy and horror of human obsession.

 

In Mark Synnott’s unique window on the ethos of climbing, his friend Alex Honnold’s astonishing free solo ascent of El Capitan’s 3,000 feet of sheer granite is the central act. When Honnold topped out at 9:28 A.M. on June 3, 2017, having spent fewer than four hours on his historic ascent, the world gave a collective gasp. The New York Times described it as “one of the great athletic feats of any kind, ever.” Synnott’s personal history of his own obsession with climbing since he was a teenager—through professional climbing triumphs and defeats, and the dilemmas they render—makes this a deeply reported, enchanting revelation about living life to the fullest. What are we doing if not an impossible climb?

Synnott delves into a raggedy culture that emerged decades earlier during Yosemite’s Golden Age, when pioneering climbers like Royal Robbins and Warren Harding invented the sport that Honnold would turn on its ear. Painting an authentic, wry portrait of climbing history and profiling Yosemite heroes and the harlequin tribes of climbers known as the Stonemasters and the Stone Monkeys, Synnott weaves in his own experiences with poignant insight and wit: tensions burst on the mile-high northwest face of Pakistan’s Great Trango Tower; fellow climber Jimmy Chin miraculously persuades an official in the Borneo jungle to allow Honnold’s first foreign expedition, led by Synnott, to continue; armed bandits accost the same trio at the foot of a tower in the Chad desert . . .

The Impossible Climb is an emotional drama driven by people exploring the limits of human potential and seeking a perfect, choreographed dance with nature. Honnold dared far beyond the ordinary, beyond any climber in history. But this story of sublime heights is really about all of us. Who doesn’t need to face down fear and make the most of the time we have?

 

Brandon Pullan

Over the past 100 years, climbers have been pushing standards in the Canadian Rockies. From long alpine ridges to steep north faces, the Rockies are synonymous with cutting edge ascents. Peaks such as Robson, Chephren, Kitchener, Twins and Alberta elude the many and reward the few. Many of the big faces were climbed between the 1960s and 1990, the golden age of alpinism in the Rockies. The men and women who first were part of the golden age set high standards. Future alpinists read old journals and guidebooks, hoping to experience what the alpine “pioneers” did. The Rockies require a certain edge that comes with age, humiliation and failure, for most. Perhaps the ones who drink the most whiskey, dream of the biggest peaks and sleep with snowballs in their hands are the ones rewarded with the momentary triumph of coming to a draw with one of these mountains.

This is not a guidebook, rather a story book by the people who risked life and limb to establish long and difficult climbs in the style of bold. What kind of climb? The scary kind of climb, the kind that will send most packing and the kind that rarely gets climbed, but often are dreamed about. They demand every inch of one’s physical, mental and spiritual self being. The kind that might, has and could kill. These climbs are not for the weak of heart, the beginner or even the advanced climber. They are for a rare breed. A breed that through experience in harsh and unpleasant situations have honed their skills in a manner that allows them to ante up. The mountains dictate the route and conditions, the climbers dictate the style. These routes are perhaps enjoyed best through the words of others, the pictures taken with frosty lenses and numb fingers, the stories told by the bold souls who knowingly stepped into the spiritual, mental and physical struggle these mountains offer. Suffering, unforgiving circumstances, where if mistakes are made there is a price to pay.

The grades are trivial, for it is the experience, not the difficulty that defines the route. These are not any-given-weekend routes. Many factors must align for an ascent to go down, conditions of both the route and the climber must be tip top. These routes are for occasions when the mind and body need a check, a good check. With an increasing number of people entering the world of climbing, it is important to keep these stories close. To know a small group of climbers including Canadian, European, American and South Africans made bold decisions that brought the world’s attention to Canada.

Legends were born, men died. The mountains made of rotten rock, ice and snow kept the stakes high. Once the summits were had, the walls had to be had. Nearly 100 years after the rise of alpinism in Europe, it began in Canada. The 1860s are for Europe what the 1960s are for Canada. The peaks had been climbed and it was time for the faces. The pursuit of difficulty on steep terrain, ice and rock marked the dawn of the golden era and the 25 bold and cold.

 

 

Billy Davidson (1947–2003) was born in Calgary, Alberta, and grew up in an orphanage in the 1950s. Living close to the Rockies, he was introduced to mountaineering at an early age and climbed his first mountain at 12 years old, eventually becoming one of Canada’s most prolific big wall climbers, with historic ascents in the Rockies and Squamish, along with an early ascent of the North America Wall of El Capitan in Yosemite. After suffering a nearly fatal fall in the late 1970s, he abandoned the climbing scene and moved to BC’s Pacific Northwest, where he spent most of his time kayaking and painting, living alone on various remote islands in the Inside Passage for over 30 years.

A sometimes meticulous journal writer, Davidson made what would be his last entry, on December 7, 2003. Three months after Billy’s final diary note, he was found dead near his camp in the remote Goose Islands group near Hakai, British Columbia. He died of a gunshot wound to the head.

Based on years of research using Davidson’s journals and dozens of interviews with those who knew him, outdoor journalist Brandon Pullan has penned a remarkable biography of an enigmatic character who continues to loom large in both the mountaineering and the kayaking communities of western Canada.

 

James Mills

“An important new book about a crucial challenge facing the conservation movement” — Spencer Black, vice president, Sierra Club -Chronicles the first all-African American summit attempt on Denali, the highest point in North America -Part adventure story, part history, and part argument for the importance of inspiring future generations to value nature The nation’s wild places–from national and state parks to national forests, preserves, and wilderness areas–belong to all Americans. But not all of us use these resources equally. Minority populations are much less likely to seek recreation, adventure, and solace in our wilderness spaces. It’s a difference that African American author James Mills addresses in his new book, The Adventure Gap: Changing the Face of the Outdoors. Bridging the so-called “adventure gap” requires role models who can inspire the uninitiated to experience and enjoy wild places. Once new visitors are there, a love affair often follows. This is important because as our country grows increasingly multicultural, our natural legacy will need the devotion of people of all races and ethnicities to steward its care. In 2013, the first all-African American team of climbers, sponsored by the National Outdoor Leadership School (NOLS), challenged themselves on North America’s highest point, the dangerous and forbidding Denali, in Alaska. Mills uses Expedition Denali and its team members’ adventures as a jumping-off point to explore how minority populations view their place in wild environments and to share the stories of those who have already achieved significant accomplishments in outdoor adventures–from Mathew Henson, a Black explorer who stood with Peary at the North Pole, to Kai Lightner, a teenage sport climber currently winning national competitions. The goal of the expedition, and now the book, is to inspire minority communities to look outdoors for experiences that will enrich their lives, and to encourage them toward greater environmental stewardship.

 

 Matt Abbots Bill Thompson Jon Jugenheimer

In a landscape with more forest and stone than people, rock climbers have found a vertical playground and solitude rarely seen in other climbing areas. Spanning the breadth of the peninsula and featuring more than 400 routes, A Rock Climber’s Guide to Michigan’s Upper Peninsula is the most complete source for information for climbs in the U.P.

 

 

 

 

Michigan’s Upper Peninsula is a land of wild places and long winters, a perfect recipe for great ice climbs. With the beauty of Lake Superior as a backdrop, this is an adventure not to be missed. In An Ice Climber’s Guide to Michigan’s Upper Peninsula you’ll find the most thorough and up-to-date information on more than 200 climbable ice formations ranging from Black River in the west to Pictured Rocks in the east.